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Is Obesity A Disease It Has Symptoms

You may ask is obesity a disease?

The answer to this question is not a simple one. Whether you ask the World Health Organization, American Medical Association or the American Obesity Association you will get differing opinions on whether obesity should be classified as a disease.

This is a question that we at What Is Obesity have put some thought into ourselves. Classifying obesity as a disease could potentially lead to more resources being put into further research and treatment of obesity and its related symptoms. This classification could also potentially lead to easier access to treatment for those suffering with this condition. If more insurers covered obesity treatments early there would be less long term costs in regards to obesity.

There are some unfortunate complications of calling obesity a disease.

There are a number of experts that feel a disease classification would lead to less people taking responsibility. I personally feel that the people that are going to make excuses will do it whether obesity is a disease or a condition. To this writer this argument is at best pointless.

A potential more serious problem that I feel may come with obesity being considered a disease is discrimination. I believe the prejudices and ridicule will be even worse when an obesity diagnosis is confirmed as a disease. I know I could be way off base in this (It wouldn’t be the first time). It seems to me that the ridicule directed towards people who are overweight is not only condoned but encouraged by persons in positions of power, such as in the media or politicians. Possibly a disease classification of obesity would create protections but I doubt it.

 

Back to the question at hand is obesity a disease.

A web search provides the following definition of disease. “A disorder of structure or function in a human, animal, or plant, esp. one that produces specific signs or symptoms or that affects a specific location and is not simply a direct result of physical injury”

So is obesity a disorder of structure or function? As a simple layman that has dealt with obesity I’m going to go with yes. Are there specific obesity symptoms? I think most would agree there are many. I could list them here but I think we all know the major symptoms of obesity.

At this point the answer to is obesity a disease is one that will still take much debate and even more bureaucracy before a definitive decision is made. The designation will be ultimately decide based on profit potential for doctors insurance companies and big pharma. That seems to just be the way it works.

Classifying obesity as a disease could lead to major advancements in obesity research. There have been some great inroads when it comes to obesity research this extra push could be all that is needed to find a major way to win this fight.

This extra research is needed there is so much more that we just don’t know about, like why so much of the world is becoming fat. Those that believe that it is as simple as calories in versus calories expended have their heads firmly stuck up… (Maybe I should go with) in the sand.

Is obesity a disease? I don’t know. Should we call it a disease? Yes, if only for the sake of the additional research. The argument against, that less people will take responsibility is weak at best.

For a great paper on is obesity a disease check out this link from the obesity society.

Can The Lean Belly Prescription Help You

There are a number of folks looking into the Lean Belly Prescription recently. The following is a guest review that we hope will leave you more informed. Weight loss these days is such a complicated subject. The rest of this article may at least increase your understanding of the Lean Belly Prescription.

The Lean Belly Prescription: A Guest Review

We all know that having volumes of belly fat can be bothersome. It doesn’t just give us those unpleasant “muffin tops”; it puts stress on the rest of our bodies and adds to problems like coronary disease, diabetes and more. Now, however, there is a new book out there called the Lean Belly Prescription that claims to help readers get rid of their muffin tops and improve their health. The book has been assessed in many different places and we wanted to know if its contents were really better than anything else online, so we decided to take a closer look at it.

The book is available through regular book selling retailers like Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble and Borders. This is a superb sign because it adds legitimacy to the project. It can also help make it easier to buy because you don’t have to concern yourself with some affiliate giving a trumped up review to ensure they earn a commission on a product that doesn’t help you. This book has been written by Travis Stork. You most likely recognize him as one of the physicians from the syndicated show “The Doctors” in addition to a reality contestant on “The Bachelor.” He is of course more, however, than just a TV personality. He is a real medical doctor who works in an emergency room at a reputable hospital.

Dr. Stork uses the book to plug his Pick 3 to Lean system. With the Pick 3 to Lean system, you are provided the chance to customize your lifestyle and eating habits without being forced to spend a bunch of time working out or exercising at the gym. The plan claims to help you shed pounds without having to give up any of the things you love—food, free time, etc. The program centers on the theory of N.E.A.T, or Non-Exercise Activity Thermogenesis. This theory says that it is possible to burn off calories without having to work out.

From what we read, this specific book makes a lot of nice promises but isn’t going to offer up any new or particularly revelation-worthy information. The real fact is that most of the details within this book could be found by doing a few basic Google searches and using your common sense. This is going to be a major dissatisfaction for the people who like to know the reasoning behind the instructions that they are given and expected to adhere to. There is very little theory in the pages of this guide. It simply presents readers a lot of directions and plans and tells them to follow them. This is a superb book for somebody who enjoys being given instructions but doesn’t like to bother about why the instructions are given.

Regular thought tells us that the proper way to lose fat is exercise and good eating habits. This book doesn’t use that traditional logic so there isn’t a real way to tell whether or not it will work the way the marketing promises it will. Of course, it’s definitely worth a look, particularly when you get permission from your medical doctor (your own doctor, not the doctor who wrote the book).

Is the Lean Belly Prescription worth buying?

Only you can answer that. I like to evaluate as many of these “diet” books as I can in an effort to find the latest “new thing” or “magic pill” unfortunately there is rarely anything new. As long as you are aware that there is no magic cure to obesity it may be worth checking out.

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